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Modal Verbs

A request, permission, certainty, advice, threat, expectation, necessity, prohibition, lack, willingness, ability, possibility, suggestion, impossibility, preference.

If we use a different modal, the meaning of the verb will change.
 

Modal Verbs


Part A. Expectation

Part A. Expectation What is the difference between advice and expectation?   Expectation refers to events or situations that we believe to be true. Should and ought to give this meaning.   Present     She should be researching now.   He ought to be in the office this morning. She shouldn’t be at home now....

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Part B. Requests for Action

Part B. Requests for Action   There are four modals, that can be used to request action. They differ in levels of politeness. Time expressions such as tomorrow, next week, next year, etc. may be used to give a future meaning.   Would, could: These words are formal and polite. Could you come in? Would...

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Part C. Requests for Permission

Part C. Requests for Permission People are sometimes confused by the difference between requests for action and requests for permission. It is important to remember that most requests for action use the pronoun you. In requests for permission, on the other hand, we ask permission to perform an action ourselves or for another person to...

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Part D. Would

Part D. Uses of Would Focus a bit on this shit.   Desire I want may sometimes sound like a demand. There are times when it is inappropriate to use it. Compare the following examples:   Would like is followed by a noun or an infinitive, and when spoken, would is often contracted. I’d like...

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Part E. Obligation / Need

Part E. Obligation / Need obligation and lack of obligation.   When we are expressing the need to follow external rules, we use have to. You have to improve your quality of service.   You have to work harder.   You have to listen to what I have to say.     

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Part F.  Must and Have to

Part F.  Must and Have to We express internal rules (0r personal obligations) using must. When an obligation is based on a rule (written or unwritten) or law, we use have to. The use of must or have to also give an idea of moral obligation.   Common examples of external obligation I must be...

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Part G: Lack of Need or Obligation

Part G: Lack of Need or Obligation !!! do not confuse do not have to and must not.   To express lack of need or obligation, we use do not have to. This means there is a choice as to whether the person does the action or not.     Present form You do not...

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Part H: Prohibition

Part H:  ProhibitionProhibition means that you are not allowed to do something. Must not and cannot express this concept. At a museum -You must not touch the exhibits.You cannot eat or drink in the galleries. On the road - You must not exceed the speed limit.You cannot pass a stop sign. Within the family -You must not come...

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